The sixties and civil rights

To make matters worse, laws were passed in some states to limit voting rights for blacks.

The sixties and civil rights

Beforethe music of the sixties still reflected the sound, style and beliefs of the previous decade and many of the hit records were by artists who had found mainstream success in the s, like Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Dion, and The Everly Brothers.

In and the years to follow, a number of social influences changed what popular music was and gave birth to the diversity that we experience with music today. The assassination of President Kennedy, the escalation of the war in Vietnam and the forward-progress of the Civil Rights Movement all greatly impacted the mood of American culture and the music began to reflect that change.

The "British Invasion" also began around with the arrival of The Beatles on the music scene and the type of rabid fandom that followed them would change the way people would view and interact with music and musicians forever.

As these bands gained popularity, many of them ventured into new music territory and created their own unique styles. The one band that comes to mind when speaking of the British Invasion is The Beatles, who first broke into the US music scene inbut really became popular in after appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show.

The Beatles dominated worldwide charts from that point in time until they broke up in The phenomenon that surrounded them was known as Beatlemania and many up and coming music acts emulated their "Liverpool Sound".

Motown started as a Detroit-based record label in the late fifties and early sixties, but it quickly turned into much more as the acts gained popularity worldwide. Two of the most influential groups to come out of the Motown sound were Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and Diana Ross and the Supremes, both of which had as much chart success as any of the rock groups that dominated the airwaves during the sixties.

Rock music dominated the popular music scene during the decade and as the genre grew and changed, many diverse and new subgenres emerged, all tied to original rock but each with their own unique style and purpose.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965

These specific subgenres also had varying levels of popularity throughout the decade and many are still popular today. Quite a few rock bands and musicians oscillated between these genres depending on what was popular at the time and used it as a way to experiment with finding their own true sound.

Some of the rock subgenres that we will touch upon are surf, psychedelic, roots, and hard rock.

The sixties and civil rights

It is important to remember that the specific artists we discuss in these various sections often fall into more than one category and it is up for debate amongst their fans what genre they best represent.

We have tried our best to categorize these artists and realize there was much cross-over during the decade. Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock Surf rock began in Southern California as a type of dance music that was mostly instrumental and it became quite popular in the early to mid sixties, until the British Invasion took over the music scene.

The subject matter for surf rock was quite literally surfing, however, that expanded as the genre grew in popularity to songs about girls, cars and general teenage antics.

The most influential and popular group to come out of the genre were The Beach Boys, whose vocal harmonies and well-crafted compositions came to define the genre. The Beach Boys were one of the only bands to come out of the genre and sustain their success.

Psychedelic rock was popular during the latter half of the s and reached its peak at the end of the decade. Psychedelic music was associated with the hippie counter-culture and hallucinogenic drug use and it was created with the intention of "enhancing" the experience of listeners who were using LSD or other mind-altering substances.

The lyrics were often strange and made reference to drugs and bands would often use instruments that were not usual, like the sitar, tabla, harpsichord and organ.

There was much experimentation in the sound and much of it was influenced by Eastern and Indian music. Roots Rock and Hard Rock Roots rock emerged in the mid to late s as a combination of several genres and subgenres of rock music that were popular at the time. And, the genre was exemplified by its "back to basics" sound.

Bob Dylan is thought to have pioneered the genre with the release of his album Blonde on Blonde that demonstrated what roots rock was to become.

The sixties and civil rights

Many of the most popular bands of the time joined the "roots revival" and crafted albums of their own that featured and experimented with a roots sound.

The sound is characterized by more aggressive tones and delivery. Hard rock vocalists are identified by their higher range and distinct and often raspy voices. The music was influenced heavily by blues rock, garage rock, and rhythm and blues.

1968 Democratic Convention

This style became associated with rebellious youth and an anti-authority demeanor, with a few acts even destroying their own instruments on stage like The Who.

Due to their hard-partying lifestyles, many musicians that were a part of the hard rock scene developed drug and alcohol problems. As a result of these problems, quite a few influential musicians died at a young age from substance abuse or accidents related to substance abuse like Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix.

Folk Rock and Protest Music Folk rock came onto the scene as a popular genre in the mid-sixties and much of it grew out of the protest movements that were active during those turbulent times. Much of the folk rock and protest movement was born out of the emerging group of singer-songwriters that were influenced by the folk musicians of the s.

Bob Dylan became one of the most prominent songwriters of the decade with many popular groups such as The Byrds and Peter, Paul and Mary covering his songs successfully.The Civil Rights Movement and the escalating war in Vietnam were the two greatest catalysts for social protest in the sixties (University of Virginia: The Civil Rights Movement.

). The ongoing and escalating war in Vietnam was the focus of many of the major protests during the sixties as its effects were felt throughout the world.

The Civil Rights Movement: A Photographic History, [Steven Kasher] on srmvision.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This volume tells the story of the American civil rights movement through the rousing and often wrenching photographs that recorded.

´╗┐The Civil Rights movement is possibly the most pivotal event of the sixties. Starting with Brown v Board, the desegregation of schools, freedom rides, and sit ins of the 's, race tension in the sixties exploded on to the American social and political landscape.

Grove Atlantic is an American independent literary publisher based in NYC. Our imprints: Grove Press, Atlantic Monthly Press, Black Cat, and Mysterious Press. The "Motown Sound" and popular R&B music had a major significance in terms of the Civil Rights movement and integration in American society during the sixties.

The role of Civil Rights Movement in the history of the United States of America.

Freedom Movement Bibliography